David Letterman, Uber, Twitter: Broadsheet May 16

David Letterman, Uber, Twitter: Broadsheet May 16

Such out-of-court settlements are typically smaller—but that’s not their only benefit for businesses. “It also limits the survivor’s ability to speak publicly and openly about the harassment or assault he or she has endured.” In a Tuesday blog post called “Turning the lights on,” Uber chief legal officer Tony West discussed the company’s decision, explaining that move is the result of a new corporate mantra: “We do the right thing, period.” Writes West: “We have learned it’s important to give sexual assault and harassment survivors control of how they pursue their claims.” For now, the changes in Uber’s policy apply only to the U.S. and only to claims regarding sexual misbehavior; complaints about pay inequity and racial discrimination are still bound by mandatory arbitration clauses. Together we can enact massive positive change and do what’s best for passengers & drivers.” The Uber competitor has since announced the same changes in policy (which also only apply to sexual misconduct). Fortune • Twitter takes on trolls. Twitter is experimenting with a new way to curb abusive comments: featuring suspected trolls less prominently on the site. Fortune • Equality=economic growth. The Nordic countries—which consistently rank as the happiest in the world—have grown considerably richer thanks to decades of policies designed to improve gender equality, according to a new OECD report. Bloomberg • Follow-ons for female founders. We all know by now how hard it is for women to raise venture capital, but Fortune alum Kia Kokalitcheva goes a step further, looking at how many all-female teams raise follow-on funding (spoiler: not many). “Only 39% of all-female founder teams raise follow-on funding for their startups, compared to 52% for all-male teams.

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Driving to better policies. Uber is ending its use of mandatory arbitration for claims of sexual harassment and assault, meaning riders, drivers, and employees will now be free to sue the company in public court, rather having to go through an impartial private arbitrator. A reminder: mandatory arbitration is a common practice in corporate America in which companies require employees (and sometimes customers) to agree to engage in arbitration if they bring a complaint against the company. Such out-of-court settlements are typically smaller—but that’s not their only benefit for businesses. “In many cases, it’s a one-sided maneuver by companies to limit their chances of facing public backlash,” notes Fortune‘s Don Reisinger. “It also limits the survivor’s ability to speak publicly and openly about the harassment or assault he or she has endured.”

In a Tuesday blog post called “Turning the lights on,” Uber chief legal officer Tony West discussed the company’s decision, explaining that move is the result of a new corporate mantra: “We do the right thing, period.” Writes West: “We have learned it’s important to give sexual assault and harassment survivors control of how they pursue their claims.” For now, the changes in Uber’s policy apply only to the U.S. and only to claims regarding sexual misbehavior; complaints about pay inequity and racial discrimination are still bound by mandatory arbitration clauses.

West invited Lyft to help create a reporting framework: “Data transparency is only meaningful if we describe and categorize sexual assault incidents in the same way. We’re ready to work with Lyft, advocates and others to make that a reality,” he wrote on Twitter. Lyft’s COO Jon McNeill also accepted the challenge (also via Twitter): “Count us in. Together we can enact massive positive change and do what’s best for passengers & drivers.” The Uber competitor has since announced the same changes in policy (which also only apply to sexual misconduct).
Fortune

Twitter takes on trolls. Twitter is experimenting with a new way to curb abusive comments: featuring suspected trolls less prominently on the site. The goal, says Fortune‘s…

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