Facebook, Twitter whack away at midterm misinformation on Election Day

Facebook, Twitter whack away at midterm misinformation on Election Day

As midterm election season comes around, social media site Twitter is catching heat for failing to stop fake news. Buzz60 SAN FRANCISCO – As voters headed to the polls on Election Day, social media companies scoured their platforms for any content that would deter them. In recent days, Twitter cracked down on a rumor that Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents would check voters' citizenship at the polls and deport anyone in the country illegally and deleted more than 10,000 automated accounts posting messages claiming to be from Democrats that discouraged people from voting in Tuesday's election. The stakes could not be higher for Facebook and Twitter after Russian operatives targeted African-American, Hispanic and LGBT voters with false voting information. Still, researchers are alarmed by misleading information and outright fabrication on social media. New research from Oxford University’s Computational Propaganda Project found that "junk news" is spreading more widely on social media in this election cycle than it did two years ago. Those have been rapidly addressed by the platforms," a Department of Homeland Security official said Tuesday. "No tie back to any foreign actors that we have seen." More: Who paid for that political ad in your Facebook feed? It's not always easy to figure out More: Facebook discloses possible election meddling by Russia, foreign actors on eve of midterms More: Facebook takes down ads mentioning African-Americans and Hispanics, calling them political

GOP uses Beto O’Rourke’s 1998 mug shot in St. Paddy’s Day Twitter attack
Donald Trump Jr.’s “Loser Teachers” Comment Has Twitter Fighting Mad
Trump’s week on Twitter a plentiful one — even for him

As midterm election season comes around, social media site Twitter is catching heat for failing to stop fake news. Veuer’s Natasha Abellard has the story. Buzz60

SAN FRANCISCO – As voters headed to the polls on Election Day, social media companies scoured their platforms for any content that would deter them.

Facebook said it swiftly removed misinformation, such as posts and memes urging Republicans and Democrats to vote on the wrong day and claims that federal immigration agents would be patrolling polling places.

In recent days, Twitter cracked down on a rumor that Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents would check voters’ citizenship at the polls and deport anyone in the country illegally and deleted more than 10,000 automated accounts posting messages claiming to be from Democrats that discouraged people from voting in Tuesday’s election.

The stakes could not be higher for Facebook and Twitter after Russian operatives targeted African-American, Hispanic and LGBT voters with false voting information. If social media companies can’t clamp down on the spread of misleading information during elections, lawmakers have threatened regulation.

Yet falsehoods continued to spread Tuesday. Two busloads of “illegals” were paid to vote for Texas Senator Ted Cruz’s challenger Beto O’Rourke. Not true. Florida gubernatorial candidate Andrew Gillum’s siblings were charged with voter fraud. Also not true. Early voting numbers are in from Michigan. There is no early voting period in Michigan. BuzzFeed busted a fake Donald Trump Twitter account with more than 10,000 followers which had been spreading Election Day hoaxes.

USA TODAY also found Twitter posts, some directing Republicans to vote on Nov. 7, others directing Democrats to cast their ballots a day late, but most of the misinformation appeared to have very limited reach and to be relatively harmless.

Still, researchers are alarmed by misleading information and outright fabrication…

Pin It on Pinterest

Shares
Share This