For president-elect, Twitter is the new ‘fireside chat’

For president-elect, Twitter is the new ‘fireside chat’

For president-elect, Twitter is the new ‘fireside chat’. Take this question, for example. If a president has chosen Twitter to communicate with the people he represents, is it ethical to “block” people from following him and, thus, hearing what he has to say? It’s absurd.” “The president should speak to all Americans directly and not filter people out,” Timothy Naftali, a presidential historian at New York University, tells the Times. “Are people blocked from watching television or listening to radio when a president gives an address? Just tried watching Saturday Night Live – unwatchable! Sad — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) December 4, 2016 Shortly after that the president-elect tackled policy in a series of tweets targeting another Indiana company threatening to leave the country. The U.S. is going to substantialy reduce taxes and regulations on businesses, but any business that leaves our country for another country, — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) December 4, 2016 fires its employees, builds a new factory or plant in the other country, and then thinks it will sell its product back into the U.S. …… — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) December 4, 2016 without retribution or consequence, is WRONG! This tax will make leaving financially difficult, but….. — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) December 4, 2016 these companies are able to move between all 50 states, with no tax or tariff being charged. THE UNITED STATES IS OPEN FOR BUSINESS — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) December 4, 2016

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Donald Trump’s penchant for communicating via Twitter while ignoring mainstream media is rewriting all the rules.

Take this question, for example. If a president has chosen Twitter to communicate with the people he represents, is it ethical to “block” people from following him and, thus, hearing what he has to say?

“It makes me laugh in a way that’s not funny,” activist Heather Spohr, 37, a blogger and freelance writer, tells the Los Angeles Times. “I can’t see the tweets of the president-elect. He’s going to be my president. It’s absurd.”

“The president should speak to all Americans directly and not filter people out,” Timothy Naftali, a presidential historian at New York University, tells the Times. “Are people blocked from watching television or listening to radio when a president gives an address? The president-elect needs to get used to the idea that presidential words matter. And everyone needs access to those words.”

Whoever saw this sort of question coming?

Last night, predictably, Saturday Night Live poked at the president-elect’s…