How to Use Facebook to Market Your Products

How to Use Facebook to Market Your Products

How to Use Facebook to Market Your Products. Steve and his wife run an ecommerce site that sells handkerchiefs and linens at BumblebeeLinens.com. Steve says the store has several target audiences. Win-back Campaigns Steve explains that a win-back campaign targets people who have already purchased from your shop because those people are more likely to buy again. To automate the Facebook component of the campaign, Steve says the ecommerce system Klaviyo allows Bumblebee Linens to export a specific segment (in this case people who haven’t purchased in 60 days) and create a Facebook custom audience that’s updated dynamically. Facebook Dynamic Ads Steve uses Facebook’s Dynamic Ads for customers who have visited the Bumblebee Linens website but haven’t made a purchase. To set up Facebook dynamic ads, ecommerce platforms like Shopify have plugins that cost about $50 per month or you can set up dynamic ads yourself through Facebook. Four hours after a customer abandons his or her cart, Bumblebee Linens sends the first email saying, “We noticed you started the checkout process at Bumblebee Linens but didn’t quite finish. People who abandon their carts see a Facebook ad based on a Facebook custom audience (also similar to the win-back campaign). For instance, if a customer returns and has looked at a couple of products (and not started checkout), and hasn’t gotten an email from them in the last three days, Steve will send an email showing the product the customer was viewing along with recommendations.

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Do you have products to sell?

Have you tried using Facebook ads to promote your products?

To find out how to market products via Facebook, I interview Steve Chou.

More About This Show

The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It’s designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing.

In this episode, I interview Steve Chou. Steve and his wife run an ecommerce site that sells handkerchiefs and linens at BumblebeeLinens.com. He’s also host of the My Wife Quit Her Job podcast and the website MyWifeQuitHerJob.com, where he teaches people how to sell physical products online.

Steve explains which Facebook ad types he uses to sell his physical products.

You’ll discover how Steve uses email and Facebook ads in tandem.

How to Use Facebook to Market Your Products featuring insights from Steve Chou on the Social Media Marketing Podcast.
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How to Use Facebook to Market Your Products featuring insights from Steve Chou on the Social Media Marketing Podcast.

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Here are some of the things you’ll discover in this show:

How to Use Facebook to Market Physical Products

Steve’s Story

As Steve and his wife were preparing for their wedding, his wife wanted a nice handkerchief because she expected to cry during the service. After shopping around, they imported a bunch of handkerchiefs from Asia. After using only a few, Steve and his wife listed the rest on eBay, where they sold like hotcakes.

Later, when Steve’s wife became pregnant with their first child, she wanted to quit her six-figure income job. They reconnected with the handkerchief vendor and opened their online store, Bumblebee Linens. At first, Steve worked as a microprocessor designer by day, and after the baby went to bed, Steve and his wife ran the business. It became such a success that they maintained their income even after his wife quit her job.

Steve explains that soon afterward, their friends began wanting to have kids and quit their jobs, and they kept asking Steve how to launch an ecommerce store. Instead of answering the same questions over and over again, Steve began blogging about his experiences running the store. That’s how MyWifeQuitHerJob.com got started in 2009.

MyWifeQuitHerJob.com documents how to run an online store.
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Steve created MyWifeQuitHerJob.com to document their experiences.

To generate sales in the early days, Steve used Google AdWords. His brother-in-law worked at Google in the AdWords division and showed Steve how to use it. Back in 2007, Steve generated a lot of sales via clicks that cost him about 10 to 15 cents.

Steve says online content also helped generate sales. They wrote articles to help brides and provide craft ideas for their products. After three to six months, the articles started ranking in search engines and sent traffic to their store, too.

Today, Bumblebee Linens sells handkerchiefs, linen napkins, linen towels, lace parasols, aprons, and more. Steve says the store has several target audiences. The handkerchief audience includes people planning weddings and an over-55 crowd. Event and wedding planners are the target audience for napkins and moms are the audience for Mommy & Me aprons. The company has in-house embroidery machines for personalizing their products.

There are several target audiences for Bumblebee Linens.
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Bumblebee Linens has many products and therefore several audiences.

Listen to the show to learn more about the audience and the content on MyWifeQuitHerJob.com.

Win-back Campaigns

Steve explains that a win-back campaign targets people who have already purchased from your shop because those people are more likely to buy again. To run this type of campaign, you need to figure out who those people are, and if they haven’t purchased within a certain timeframe, give them an incentive to come back.

You can automate a win-back campaign with an online merchant system. For example, if someone hasn’t purchased from Bumblebee Linens in 60 days, they automatically receive an email and a Facebook ad with a 10%-off coupon.

To automate the Facebook component of the campaign, Steve says the ecommerce system Klaviyo allows Bumblebee Linens to export a specific segment (in this case people who haven’t purchased in 60 days) and create a Facebook custom audience that’s updated dynamically. So each day, customers who haven’t purchased in 60 days are added to that audience automatically and customers who make a purchase are removed.

As the campaign continues, Steve uses a discount ladder. If a customer continues not to buy, he or she receives a 15%-off coupon after 75 days and then a 20%-off coupon after 90 days. With a discount ladder, your goal is to offer the smallest coupon needed to complete the sale. If you can get someone with the 10%-off coupon, that’s the best-case scenario.

Win-back campaigns offer incentives for customers to purchase.
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Steve creates win-back campaigns through email and Facebook ads.

Steve adds that you can do this campaign with another provider; however, one of the key things about making this hands-off is the Dynamic Custom Audience in Facebook. Other software would require doing these updates manually.

Steve shares that win-back campaigns work well for Bumblebee Linens because the company has established trust with returning customers. The conversion rates are in the double digits. In terms of the return on ad spend, for every $1 spent, the company makes $5 to $6.

I ask Steve whether win-back campaigns work better on certain platforms. Steve says the campaign works best if you share the coupon on different platforms simultaneously because each person spends time online in different places (email, Facebook, or surfing the web). However, Steve shares that if he had to rank the importance of each platform for his store, email is best, then Facebook, followed by Google retargeting.

Listen to the show to hear how you can apply this strategy to digital products.

Facebook Dynamic Ads

Steve uses Facebook’s Dynamic Ads for customers who have visited the Bumblebee Linens website but haven’t made a purchase. Steve says dynamic ads are also helpful when you have a lot of products. Bumblebee Linens has 480 SKUs, which makes it cumbersome to run specifically retargeted ads to a customer. However, with dynamic ads, you can upload an entire product list to Facebook and show customers ads that…

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