It’s Trivially Easy to Hack into Anybody’s Myspace Account

It’s Trivially Easy to Hack into Anybody’s Myspace Account

Composite by Louise Matsakis/Motherboard. Myspace? More like Everyonespace. Myspace offers a mechanism to recover an account for people who have lost access to their old associated email address. A security researcher has discovered that it's relatively easy to abuse this mechanism to hack into anyone's account. Security researcher Leigh-Anne Galloway disclosed the vulnerability on Monday. But Myspace, which last year had to admit that it lost the passwords of more than 400 million users, should still take care of its users' security, according to Galloway. If you have an end of life application or website, you have to have a plan," Galloway, a researcher at Positive Technologies, a security firm, told Motherboard in a Twitter chat. Motherboard verified that, indeed, all one needs to take over somebody else's Myspace account is full name, username, and date of birth. "I'm shocked they haven't fixed this."

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Image: Tim Green/Flickr, and Myspace. Composite by Louise Matsakis/Motherboard.

Myspace? More like Everyonespace.

If you are one of the almost half a billion people who at some point used to be on Myspace, the hottest social network of the early 2000s, you should know that almost anyone can hack into your account.

Myspace offers a mechanism to recover an account for people who have lost access to their old associated email address. A security researcher has discovered that it’s relatively easy to abuse this mechanism to hack into anyone’s account. All a wannabe hacker needs is the target’s full name, username, and date of birth.

Security researcher Leigh-Anne Galloway disclosed the vulnerability on Monday. She says she informed Myspace about the vulnerability almost three months ago and the site hasn’t acknowledged or fixed it. (Myspace did not respond to a request for comment.)

Read more: The MySpace Worm that Changed the Internet Forever

Obviously, we’re not in 2006 anymore, and very few people still use or care about their Myspace accounts. But Myspace, which last year had to admit that it lost the passwords of more…

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