The Complete Field Guide to Brand Monitoring

The Complete Field Guide to Brand Monitoring

Brand monitoring keeps you informed on what’s said about your brand, helps you find new people to engage with and even tracks your competitors’ moves. In addition, we’ll offer free and paid options on how to monitor your brand. On social media, you’ll want to also monitor any branded hashtags, especially if they’re different from your brand name. If your brand often comes up in certain keyword search results, you’ll want to monitor what’s rising to the top. Why Brand Monitoring is Important & How to Execute It Reputation Management One of the best reasons for monitoring your brand is to quickly respond to reviews and feedback. What does this mean for your brand? For review sites like TripAdvisor and Yelp, it’s best to sign up for the business pages and receive notifications of new reviews. Customers don’t always tag brands or location check-in on social media. It also lists their top engaging post. It helps you track how customers might be feeling about your products, it keeps you ahead of any PR crises and it provides you with new content to share.

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If someone talks about your company online, will you hear about it? What if they never tagged you in the first place? Brand monitoring keeps you informed on what’s said about your brand, helps you find new people to engage with and even tracks your competitors’ moves.

For small businesses and those without a PR agency on retainer, there are tools available to help you track your brand in all the various channels. Even if you’re not active on Reddit, you’d still want to know if your company made it onto their front page.

We’ll dive in on what types of keywords you want to monitor and why you would want to monitor them. In addition, we’ll offer free and paid options on how to monitor your brand.

What to Monitor

Branded Keywords

At the most basic, you’ll want to monitor your company’s name, iterations and misspellings of the brand and any associated products. On social media, you’ll want to also monitor any branded hashtags, especially if they’re different from your brand name.

Next up in the branded keywords would be common phrases or marketing slogans. This list may evolve as you create new marketing campaigns or shed inactive ones.

Nike’s “Just Do It.” tagline is forever tied with the brand. It’s so representative that it’s the only content in their Instagram bio. The hashtag #justdoit is attached to over 13 million sports-related photos and videos.

Industry Trends or Related Phrases

Monitoring here is more informational than what’s being said about your brand online. If your brand often comes up in certain keyword search results, you’ll want to monitor what’s rising to the top. Furthermore, it helps you watch out for trends and competitors as they emerge.

To get an idea of what keywords to start with here, you can take a look at your website’s analytics reports. Google Analytics lists some search keywords that people use to find your site.

C-Suite & Other Public Figures

Depending on how large your business is or how much in the public eye your executive is, you may also want to monitor for your executives’ names. Your executives are part of your brand and monitoring when they come up in blogs, news or other conversations is important.

An extra bonus here is that if your CEO is active in the community and/or on social media, that’s more content for your brand.

The CEO of T-Mobile is known for being active on Twitter, sharing bits of his personal life and occasionally engaging with customers. The T-Mobile help team also monitors his social media, jumping in when a customer issue or question comes up.

Why Brand Monitoring is Important & How to Execute It

Reputation Management

One of the best reasons for monitoring your brand is to quickly respond to reviews and feedback. Most brands can benefit from some form of reputation management. For example, a hotel might want to monitor TripAdvisor while a restaurant would consider Yelp.

In a 2017 Brightlocal survey on reviews, 68% of US customers reported that positive reviews made them more likely to use a local business. And one review isn’t enough. The average customer reads seven reviews before trusting a business.

What does this mean for your brand? For one, responding to reviews publicly shows potential customers that you’re available and listening. If the review is negative, it also allows you a chance to offer a solution and incorporate their feedback into your company’s practices.

For review sites like TripAdvisor and Yelp, it’s best to sign up for the business pages and receive notifications of new reviews. If you have a brick and mortar location, signing up for…

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