What Do the New Twitter Rules Mean for Social Media Managers (and Buffer Customers)

What Do the New Twitter Rules Mean for Social Media Managers (and Buffer Customers)

In this blog post, we’ll share the rationale behind the new rules and what the rules would mean to you — as a Twitter user and a Buffer customer. What are the new Twitter rules (and what do they mean to you)? Here are the four key areas: Posting to multiple accounts Posting multiple similar tweets Posting multiple tweets to a trending topic Simultaneously perform actions such as Likes, Retweets, or follows from multiple accounts 1. Here’s an example of what’s not allowed: If you have multiple distinct accounts, which you wish to post the same content to, Twitter recommends that you retweet the content from one account using the remaining accounts (like Brian did in the below example). Third, you can no longer Re-Buffer previously published Twitter posts to Twitter accounts using drag-and-drop. Posting multiple similar tweets What it means to social media managers This rule means that you cannot post or schedule identical tweets (including replies and mentions) over several hours or days. Here’s an example of what’s not allowed: Here’s an example of what we try to do when we want to share a blog post several times: What it means to Buffer customers To help you prevent instances of sharing similar content multiple times unintentionally, you can no longer schedule posts for Twitter multiple times using the Power Scheduler feature. This applies to you in all of the following circumstances: Whether you are posting to a single account or multiple accounts Whether the content is exactly identical or slightly different Whether you are using a hashtag or not Here’s my best guess of what’s not allowed (e.g. when #bufferchat is trending): What it means to Buffer customers The product changes mentioned above will help you avoid posting duplicative content to a single account or multiple accounts. What it means to social media managers This rule means that you cannot use tools to help you like, retweet, or follow from multiple accounts. Reducing spam on Twitter can also greatly benefit marketers in many ways.

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Keeping Twitter safe and free from spam is a top priority for us. — Yoel Roth, API Policy and Product Trust at Twitter

This year, the team at Twitter has taken additional action to keep Twitter free from spam. Specifically, they have introduced new rules around automation and the use of multiple accounts.

You might be wondering, “why is this important to me?”

In short, Twitter might suspend your account if you fail to comply.

These rules are also encouraging good sharing practices on Twitter and will benefit everyone in the long run.

And since this is such an important topic, we would love to explore it together with you. In this blog post, we’ll share the rationale behind the new rules and what the rules would mean to you — as a Twitter user and a Buffer customer.

It’ll be great to hear your thoughts in the comments section below, too.

What Do the New Twitter Rules Mean to Social Media Managers (and Buffer Customers)
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What Do the New Twitter Rules Mean to Social Media Managers (and Buffer Customers)

Why did Twitter introduce these new rules?

First, let’s understand the rationale behind these rules.

Spam has been an issue on Twitter for a long time and you might recognize these two common types of spam:

  1. A single account posting identical (or almost identical) tweets
  2. Multiple accounts posting identical (or almost identical) tweets
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Such tweets often don’t provide the best experience to Twitter users, especially since Twitter still show most tweets in the reverse-chronological order. Such aggressive spam from others can prevent your followers from seeing your thoughtfully-created tweets.

That’s why the team at Twitter wants to tackle them with the new rules.

As you’ll find out below, the new rules may create some extra steps for you as a social media manager — regardless of whether you use automation or not. But overall, we feel that these changes will benefit Twitter as a whole and benefit you as a marketer.

What are the new Twitter rules (and what do they mean to you)?

Yoel Roth, who works on API Policy and Product Trust at Twitter, published a blog post about the new rules. The blog post, however, is targeted more at developers than marketers. Hence, we would love to share what the new rules mean to you.

The easiest way to understand the rules is this:

The Twitter Rules prohibit posting duplicative or substantially similar content — both on one account and across multiple accounts.

Let’s break that down further. Here are the four key areas:

  1. Posting to multiple accounts
  2. Posting multiple similar tweets
  3. Posting multiple tweets to a trending topic
  4. Simultaneously perform actions such as Likes, Retweets, or follows from multiple accounts

1. Posting to multiple accounts

Posting duplicative or substantially similar content, replies, or mentions over multiple accounts you control, or creating duplicate or substantially similar accounts, with or without the use of automation, is never allowed.

What it means to social media managers

There are three key takeaways from this guideline:

  1. You cannot post identical (or even almost identical) content to multiple accounts.
  2. You cannot create multiple accounts that are very similar to one another.
  3. The above applies to you whether you use an automation tool (which includes scheduling) or you manually post your tweets.

Here’s an example of what’s not allowed:

Identical tweets from multiple accounts
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Identical tweets from multiple accounts

If you have multiple distinct accounts, which you wish to post the same content to, Twitter recommends that you retweet the content from one account using the remaining accounts (like Brian did in the below example).

Retweet similar content
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Retweet similar content

Be aware, however, that “bulk, aggressive, or very high-volume automated Retweeting is not permitted”. In other words, retweeting from a few accounts is fine….

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