Why Using Social Media Is A Thing Of The Past

Why Using Social Media Is A Thing Of The Past

Using social media to promote and advertise for brands used to be a forward-thinking strategy. In the good ole’ days of early social media marketing, it made sense to “use” digital advertising in order to reach “wired” consumers. It also made sense to “use” social media to reach consumers who were discovering social media platforms. But to thrive in the age of the connected consumer, marketers need to understand why “using” social media is a thing of the past. Millennials and Gen Z are annoyed over brands targeting their social media feeds and in response, a third of them have permanently deleted their Facebook account. To clarify, it’s not that consumers are becoming less “social,” it’s just that this sociality — which can be understood as digitally-enabled “connectivity” to other consumers and to brands — appears to be increasingly migrating from social media platforms onto aggregation, social, mobilization, and learning platforms. ROI is an insufficient metric for assessing success that requires rethinking the nature of the consumer journey. The expansion of today’s connected consumer across multiple digital touchpoints means that ROI is no longer a reliable default for accurately assessing campaign success. Metrics for measuring a campaign’s success require rethinking what “value” means in the digital age. Determining if, how, why, and under what conditions a particular marketing strategy or campaign has value to a consumer requires rethinking what value means in the digital age.

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Using social media to promote and advertise for brands used to be a forward-thinking strategy. Social was the future, and early adopters were rewarded for jumping on the bandwagon when they did.

In the good ole’ days of early social media marketing, it made sense to “use” digital advertising in order to reach “wired” consumers. It also made sense to “use” social media to reach consumers who were discovering social media platforms. Back then, before widespread adoption of the internet and the advent of billions of Facebook users — that is, back in the days of interruptive advertising where campaign lifecycles and consumers’ journeys could be clearly identified, neatly segmented, and accurately assessed — it made sense, and was frankly quite easy, to “use” social media to reach consumers.

But to thrive in the age of the connected consumer, marketers need to understand why “using” social media is a thing of the past. Today, it’s important to shift from a mindset of “using” social media to a mindset of adapting and thriving in an ecosystem where a highly connected, social, empowered consumer is now the norm, and traditional econometrics and data are no longer adequate to measure and track the success of content and campaigns.

Social media is a shrinking piece of a much bigger digital pie that requires rethinking consumer’s sociality, and relationship to brands.

Consider that 77 percent of marketers rely on at least one dedicated social media platform, but less than half generate ROI from this strategy. This shouldn’t come as a surprise. Millennials and Gen Z are annoyed over brands targeting their social media feeds and in response, a third of them have permanently deleted their Facebook account.

What’s more, social platforms are changing the way they operate, making it…

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